Dutch teenagers are among the happiest young people in the world

Aug 9, 2018 admin 1306 views
Dutch teenagers are among the happiest young people in the world

The desire for more independence, relationships sometimes tense with parents and the desire for knowledge are characteristic of teenage life. Of course not all teenagers have the same experience and the environment they live in has a huge influence on their development.

If all teenagers could choose where to grow, the Netherlands would be a good choice. Young Dutch people are likely to have a positive experience in their teenage years. They are, on average, among the happiest, healthiest and well-educated adolescents living in one of the richest countries in Europe.

Earlier this year, an OECD report found that over 93% of 13 to 15-year-old children in the Netherlands had a life expectancy above average, and the subsequent UNICEF reports ranked Lowerland as one of the best places of the world for children and adolescents.

According to the World Happiness Report 2018, the Netherlands ranks 6th, with the first places being occupied by: Finland, Norway, Denmark, Iceland and Switzerland.

Moving into a happy country can make you happier!

The report also tried to assess how migration affects happiness and first studied the levels of happiness of immigrants in each country. The happiness of a country's immigrants is almost identical to that of the wider population, and the population adapts to the average level of happiness of the country they are heading for.

In a world where mental health problems are on the rise, the Netherlands remains one of the OECD nations with the lowest antidepressant use per capita.

Another element that the Dutch is doing very well is the balance between professional and personal life, surpassing Denmark, according to the OECD Better Life Index, which categorizes countries as to how household chores combine with work, family commitments and personal life, among other factors.

Only 0.5% of Dutch employees work after the program, which is the lowest rate in the OECD, where the average is 13%. Instead, they devote about 16 hours a day to eating, sleeping and short trips.

Aug 9, 2018 admin 1306 views